FORO




Responder al tema  [ 1448 mensajes ]  Ir a página Anterior  1 ... 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97  Siguiente
 Somewhere In Detroit 
Autor Mensaje

Registrado: 09 Oct 2008, 08:30
Mensajes: 866
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
chinaski escribió:
hola,

hablando de versiones, acabo de escuchar una bastante peculiar del strings of life



saludos

Es que el proyecto este de Christian Prommer es muy bueno. Subí al foro hace tiempo una sesión (más bien concierto) suya en directo, lo tenéis aquí:

http://www.clubbingspain.com/phpBB/enlaces/christian-prommer-s-drumlesson-southport-weekender-2007-t59921.html

Omar S es otro grande, me encanta el Striders World:



18 Mar 2011, 14:14
Perfil
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 25 Oct 2004, 20:33
Mensajes: 1438
Ubicación: 4K
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
hola,

dejo una entrevista que acabo de leer a octave one

creo que no se ha comentado aquí y es muy interesante. especialmente, para mí, en la forma que tienen de defender lo analógico. sin prácticamente comentar nada sobre lo digital y sin hablar mal sobre esa opción, hacen una defensa absoluta de lo analógico desde la experiencia, el conocimiento y, por qué no decirlo, un profundo cariño y respeto. tratan más temas interesantes, como sus épocas malas, el motivo de mudarse de detroit a atlanta o lo que les cautivó del techno

octave one: geared to escape

Imagen

Citar:
In the past, you halted your release schedule because you felt you had nothing to say musically. Things are better now?

Leonard: For sure, I think so. We've been doing quite a bit of touring. We call ourselves still a young band, because we've only been touring live for about ten years. We've been producing for 20. We've really been picking up tremendously as far as our tour schedule, and it kind of energises us. We're playing some things that we never thought we'd be playing this long, things that we developed in 1991. People are gigging to it like we just did it yesterday. When you get something like that, it tells you that you need to continue doing what you're doing.

Lawrence: In the early days, you would produce a track, you would press it up and it would get distributed around the world. Then, you would have to wait for the feedback to come back to you. Now, with us touring so much, we're producing a track and literally, we're jumping on a plane to this country, to that country, like three countries in a weekend and immediately, we get to see how people react.

How does that compare to bygone years?

Leonard: I think there are advantages to both; how things were and how things are. The way things were is that people were a lot more surprised, and it was a very, very special occasion for you to come [to the club] because you just didn't know what was going to go on. Now we get the reaction from tracks that people have already heard through the Internet. When they're hearing the first eight, nine beats, they know what the track is and they start screaming!

Lawrence: It's like man, we just did this track two months ago, and you already know it?

What's your live show like?

Leonard: We're all hardware based. It's not like we have anything against people who use laptops, it's just because we've always made music with hardware, all our lives. We'll use computers in our studio too, but for us, it's about connecting with the audience. You're putting up a barrier with the screen that's between you and the audience.

Lawrence: We like to feel gear too, and that's important for us. We can't really get into it if we're pushing keys and just looking at a small screen. I like to feel a knob and push a fader up and things of that nature, too. We have to have that.

You have a lot of custom gear?

Leonard: We play with some standard stuff, some modified stuff. We try to make it so that if you are a new producer, you can look at our kit and say, "I could actually do that." You can mimic what we do, it's not very difficult; most of the things are very easy to get. We have modified things too, so we have a little special sound.

Is digging for synths a similar kind of mindset to digging for records?

Leonard: It's not how it used to be as far as trying to get that unique piece, especially with the computers and stuff, because so many things have been sampled and re-created. We would get something and another producer would look at it, and they didn't know what that was, period. Now, they can google it, and figure out what it is. Just last week, we got this piece from a small company in Paris. We know that we'll have it... probably for another month before everybody sees all the pictures all over the Internet, and they'll all be trying to go and get this piece.

Do you want to tell me what it's called?

Lawrence: Check the Internet!

Leonard: Yeah, you'll see it man! We literally just got the thing, and I think it just came out. The guy hand builds them. Well, he actually sells kits, and I had him put one together for me and do a couple little extra things, so it's a little different. But, we try to stay ahead. That's the thing; you try to have some things that are very common, but you also have some things that are unique to you.

Lawrence: In the early days, we used to go to pawn shops and find this little special keyboard. Now, the pawn shop has turned into Google and eBay.

Does the hardware emphasis make touring hard?

Leonard: It's hard, man. It's much more difficult; the programming is a lot more difficult. When you're using a computer, you pretty much can just take the files from whatever program you were working in—so a lot of times people are composing in Ableton Live and they'll just perform in Ableton Live. For us, we want that analogue ripping sound to come through the systems. A lot of times, the crowd has never actually heard a raw, analogue piece of gear; they've only heard a processed piece. So it's a new experience for a lot of people. The warmth is different, it's just how it affects you audibly, in fact you can almost feel it.

Lawrence: People might be surprised at how much repair we actually do to gear also. I mean, we might roll in tomorrow and find out that a keyboard has been busted so we're trying to piece it back—literally—piece it back to together or run out to go get something to replace it. So that's big with hardware, as well.

Leonard: We just keep buying drum machines over again. Gotta get them re-modified, keep buying synthesisers over again, stuff like that, because it just gets beat up. It's so important for us to be able to have our kit and be able to show all these things. A lot of the time—well, some shows—we'll have everything covered and we'll just take it off, and the kids'll just go crazy. Like they never seen this stuff, you know what I'm saying? They've seen pictures of it, or they've seen the modules on the computer, but they've never actually seen the piece.

Tell me about the days when you guys were roadies yourselves.

Lawrence: It was like the same kind of days as now, man. We're still hauling gear around!

It was for jazz bands?

Lawrence: DJ Bob James, Alexander Zonjic. Alexander Zonjic was a flautist and Bob James was the keyboard player; he did the music to Taxi [the 1978 TV series]. It was actually a really good experience for us, because you learn how to pack gear, man; to maximise space. Literally, that's how we even move our stuff now. People will be amazed, at the table—it'll be full of gear—but it might be like, four bags that we roll in with. And they're like, "You bought all of this?" but because we're used to being roadies, you have to move this that way, and you pack it tight so it's not really jarring around a lot, too.

Going back to Detroit, would it be accurate to say that, like hip-hop today, techno was an attractive means of escape for the youth of the time, whether lower or middle class?

Lawrence: It was a form of escape, I mean it was our hip-hop, honestly. You were feeling a certain way man, you listened to like—like I remember first hearing the kick of the 909 drum, and just the way it made me feel. I would just listen to a kick, for like hours, nothing else, nothing else! And you're just playing with the kick—the toning and the decay—you just listened to it for hours. I mean, that was our escape man, it took us to another place mentally. You know, because you were in this environment that was factories, steel and smog, and that just kinda took you into paradise, just a whole 'nother atmosphere.

So that was emotional or mental escape. What about financial?

Leonard: Oh man, it took a lot of years for this. We were just buying equipment.

Lawrence: You spend more than what you make. People would look, "Oh yeah, you're this person, you're that person, it must be great." Yeah, okay, I'm still paying for that keyboard, so get your hands off of it. So I mean, financially, it was for the love of it more than anything. That's one thing I do love about hardware. You would work hard, just to get this one piece of gear. I mean, you might work six months to a year, just to buy one piece of gear, and you learned that one piece of gear in and out. You know with software, you can just load up, so you never really become a master of it. You're like, "OK, I grab this loop, this is great, I grab this little piece here," but hey man, I might take that MPC, flip it around and do all kinds of stuff, and totally amaze you that this one little piece of gear could do all of these different tricks and stuff. And that's one thing I do appreciate about hardware, man you learned it. You grab the manual, you sit there, you sit there for hours. Everybody was like that that we knew.

You learned, man, you played with kicks—literally. We would just play with kick drums for hours, and a lot of the techno guys did. We would sit up with like, Jay Denham. Jay Denham would just—I mean, that's who I got it from—Jay would just listen to a kick all night. You'd go over to the apartment, he was in front of this one speaker on the floor. You'd go over there, and you'd be tranced out with him, you'd sit there for about two minutes and you were just like, "Man that's it!" He'd put a little decay on it or something and freak it out, and you'd just be in the zone, man, and that's what I dug, that's what drew me into it even deeper.

When you started 430 West, you did it with a $500 loan from your Uncle Herb, and when you did the music video for "Jaguar," you had to sell some equipment. Have you often found yourselves in similar situations?

Leonard: For "Jaguar," we didn't sell the equipment, but for other projects, we did sell equipment. We did sell personal things.

Lawrence: Oh, I've got some pieces I wish I had back now, man.

Leonard: The one thing that we constantly have had is our 909.

Lawrence: Yeah, we won't sell the Nine. We always go, "When you sell the Nine, it's over." You might sell everything around the Nine; every keyboard, every compressor, every sampler, but once you sell the 909, that's the end.

Leonard: Yeah, so that's our symbol. I mean, we still use it and it's one of the things where I don't care how dire financially things are, we will not sell the Nine. If we can't eat, then we're gonna be looking at this 909, man.

So there were periods where things got to that point?

Leonard: Oh, for sure. This is an art that makes you suffer. Anybody who's doing this for any period of time and has any type of success, has had periods where they have tried to figure out where the next meal is coming from. It's one of those things where it's a drug, it's addictive and you wanna stay in it, but it'll take you through ups and downs.

Lawrence: Like any art, just because you create doesn't mean that people wanna purchase. So you might get into this grey area—I call it a "blue funk"—where you're creating all this music and people just aren't connecting with it.

Why did you leave Detroit for Atlanta three years ago?

Leonard: Just something different man, just a lifestyle. All we need is an airport. I'm not really overly concerned about the club culture in Atlanta, I mean we don't play in the city. We never really played in Detroit anyway, to be honest. So, a lot of people are like: "Why did you move there, what about the vibe?" It's like, we never played a lot in Detroit anyway. For us, it was just trying to shake things up, and it was just time. You know, you have to do that, especially as an artist. You can find yourself constantly in the same loop; sometimes you have to jump off that loop and do something different.

Did it work?

Leonard: Yeah, yeah it definitely did.

You've always tried to make techno akin to that from the Music Institute era. Do you think that contradicts the genre's idea of being futuristic and forward-thinking?

Leonard: It's not neccessarily making music from that era. That's a perspective that a lot of people pick up. Yout gotta think about it from this point of view: that era is when we started making music, so if you're gonna call us old-school, what you're saying is, your sound is connected to a particular time period. For us, again, we've made records ten years ago, 20 years ago, that people still haven't caught up with. All of a sudden, we'll start playing it now and they act like it's amazing, but it's something that's been sitting on the shelf forever!

Lawrence: Literally, we have records that we put out that sat up for about eight or nine years.

Leonard: You know, even with "Black Water," it was not a new record at all.

Lawrence: Yeah, it was about four or five years before we put it out.

Leonard: Yeah, yeah, and then it took about three years for it to really even happen. So it's one of those things where you talk about future music, really, we're not trying to connect ourselves with any era. And the whole concept of what techno is, as far as it being, like, the soundtrack for the future, well, we're living in the future. The things that were conceived back then—"Pocket Calculator" and stuff like that.

Lawrence: I got a pocket calculator on my BlackBerry!

Leonard: Yeah, you can't even find a pocket calculator now. So the future that Juan Atkins and Kraftwerk were conceiving, we've far exceeded that. Yeah, so it's like that soundtrack was for a time that actually, we've already passed. There was something very special about hearing a synthesiser then; it was a magical thing. But now, it's a very common thing.

So you guys don't care about that philosophy?

Leonard: We just wanna make music, man, seriously. If we get a club bumping and it's some track that we really love, that's it man. We're not sitting around asking, "Look man, let's think about, you know, 30 or 40 years down the line, what will music sound like?"

Lawrence: I mean, we didn't get into music that way. We were just playing with keyboards and we loved it. Had we sat around philosophising before we got into music that we were gonna make the soundtrack to the evolution of man, I mean, that's a whole different thing. We got into it just because we loved the way that drum kick sounded, the way that bassline felt.

We never really wanted to give you too much thought, we want it to be an escape. That's how we entered into it – it was an escape for us. So, you know, we might not be trying to tell you about the rainforest. I mean, all of these things exist—Aborigine people over here, or what's happening in the ghetto over there—all of these things exist, but we create our music as an escape from everything. We've all got bills, health issues, whatever the situation might be and we wanted to just say, "Hey, let's leave that behind for a moment, just go here; let's float in this direction, let's gel into this planet, this atmosphere." That's what it was for us.

saludos


21 Mar 2011, 15:29
Perfil

Registrado: 01 Abr 2008, 18:16
Mensajes: 119
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
Interesante entrevista chinaski. gracias!

yo tengo esta otra imagen grabada de Octave One.

Imagen


¿no es curioso que un macbook pro presida el setup?


21 Mar 2011, 16:02
Perfil

Registrado: 05 Feb 2004, 20:04
Mensajes: 137
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
Volviendo a la cuestión de cuál fue el primer tema techno, Jeff Mills opina lo siguiente:

“[...] en 1981, salió un disco llamado Sharevari que desempeñaría un papel esencial en la elaboración de lo que acabaría siendo el techno de Detroit. Lo crearon unos estudiantes de buena familia de Detroit, dos chicos y dos chicas reunidos bajo el nombre de A Number of Names. Formaban parte de un club privado para estudiantes (bautizado con el nombre de Sharivari), que organizaba fiestas y el negocio no les iba nada mal. Un día decidieron crear su propia música, se encerraron en un estudio, se inspiraron en el tema Moscow Disco del grupo belga Telex y así gravaron Sharevari. Mojo lo convirtió en todo un éxito en Detroit, pero por aquel entonces nadie había pronunciado aún la palabra “techno”; todavía no existía.

Conocí a Juan Atkins justo después de que saliera Sharevari. Tenía su propio grupo, Cybotron, adoraba a Kraftwerk y había publicado el maxi Clear. Después de Sharevari, el sonido de su música cambió. El grupo se separó y los otros dos miembros se fueron a vivir a California para dedicarse al pop, pero Juan prefirió quedarse. En 1985 publicó No UFO´s y Night drive, dos temas formidables con un sonido todavía muy próximo a Sharevari. En aquel momento, todo estalló, todo el mundo hablaba de techo sin que nadie supiera exactamente quién había inventado la palabra, pero daba igual, la nueva música de Detroit tenía una identidad propia, un sabor particular. Sharevari había sido el detonante y Juan Atkins se convirtió en el primer héroe de la trinidad techno, seguido de Derrick May y Kevin Saunderson.” (Electroshock, Laurent Garnier y David Brun-Lambert)


Sin embargo, hay quien piensa que el tema primigenio no fue ni uno ni el otro. Según Dan Sicko el honor sería para Nude Photo: “Toda la instrumentación estaba retorcida y alterada a propósito. Si quieres ponerte técnico, creo que ése fue el primer disco de techno propiamente dicho. Con Nude Photo Derrick May y Thomas Barnett, su colaborador en el tema, cambiaron el curso del sonido de Detroit.”

Yo también lo creo.




23 Mar 2011, 00:25
Perfil
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 28 Ene 2004, 15:12
Mensajes: 511
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
Este hilo empezó precisamente allá en el 2004, como pasa el tiempo, planteando las alternativas a primer tema del llamado Techno de Detroit. Propuse como alternativa a Sharevari el tema Alleys of your mind de Cybotron, auto-editado en el sello Deep Space y del que se vendieron mas de 10.000 copias sólo en Detroit, es igualmente del año 81 y creo que refleja perfectamente el sonido que vendría.



En cualquier caso todos estos discos de los que hablamos evidentemente en conjunto forman el germen del sonido y no es justo decir cual es el primero.... Es más un grupo de artistas que surgió en el mismo momento con un discurso similar y todos en un mismo lugar, lo que dice mucho de como era ese sitio a finales de los 70.

Saludos,

No hope, no dreams, no love,
My only escape Is underground.

_________________
Revolution is the Hope of the Hopeless!


23 Mar 2011, 14:05
Perfil
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 25 Oct 2004, 20:33
Mensajes: 1438
Ubicación: 4K
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
hola,

¡qué alegría que te unas a la conversación altered_ego!

podrá parecer mucho tiempo pero las posiciones que manteniais st y tú entonces siguen siendo válidas, por eso os citaba hace poco al volver a sacar el sharevari a colación. coincido en que lo importante no es tanto el disco en cuestión como el nacimiento de un tipo de sonido, y a él contribuyen ambos sin duda

personalmente, me quedo con alleys of your mind. lo reivindico porque creo innecesario irse tan tarde como el nude photo de may. lo que transcribes kirikú es muy interesante, sobre todo me gusta la visión de mills. pero me parece excesivo descartar a cybotron como pioneros

y lo reivindico también porque para mí alleys of your mind tiene algo que no está presente en sharevari y que es uno de los elementos que definen el techno. me refiero a la temática. mientras que el tema de a number of names trata (y nace en) la escena social y de fiestas de los primeros ochenta en detroit como comentaba hace poco, con su visión consumista y hedonista, alleys of your mind bebe más bien de una visión futurista y decadente que inspiraría y definiría en buena medida todo el techno. ese componente afrofuturista y cyberpunk presente en alleys of your mind y posteriormente en todo el detroit techno lo hace para mí acreedor sin duda de la condición de pionero

acaba de publicarse dancecult, una revista sesuda sobre electrónica que trae un artículo que no podía ser más oportuno sobre la relación entre detroit, techno y distopía. es denso y largo aunque muy recomendable. copio una pequeña porción donde habla específicamente sobre ambos temas

hooked on an affect: detroit techno and dystopian digital culture

richard pope escribió:
Although there is ongoing debate within the techno universe as to whether “Sharevari”, by Number of Names, or “Alleys of Your Mind”, by Cybotron, is Detroit techno’s first record, Sicko discusses “Sharevari” first since it came out of—and was oriented to—the social party scene. In contrast to “Sharevari’s” lyrics promoting a consumerist paradise of designer sheets, Porsches and fine wines, however, “Alleys of Your Mind” involves such a paranoiac turn inward that the disjunct between the two tracks should be more explicitly considered. For, if “Sharevari” and the high school party circuit involved scenes of dialectical recognition and consumerist aspiration,5 the worldview manifest in “Alleys of Your Mind” points instead to a city of atomized individuals who could no longer recognize one another, but who could only trace the consequences of this demise (for instance, by following the voices/alleys in their head/minds). It is an entirely different sensibility, mobilizing affect along an alternate path.

musicalmente, sharevari suena "más" techno en la medida que el four to the floor es mucho más marcado, mientras que alleys of your mind es más electro. sin embargo, creo que esa sensibilidad que comento permite considerar al tema de cybotron como precursor absoluto del género, porque se trata de un elemento consustancial e irrenunciable al techno de detroit

saludos


Última edición por chinaski el 27 May 2011, 16:58, editado 1 vez en total



23 Mar 2011, 16:01
Perfil
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 28 Ene 2004, 15:12
Mensajes: 511
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
chinaski escribió:
y lo reivindico también porque para mí alleys of your mind tiene algo que no está presente en sharevari y que es uno de los elementos que definen el techno. me refiero a la temática. mientras que el tema de a number of names trata (y nace en) la escena social y de fiestas de los primeros ochenta en detroit como comentaba hace poco, con su visión consumista y edonista, alleys of your mind bebe más bien de una visión futurista y decadente que inspiraría y definiría en buena medida todo el techno. ese componente afrofuturista y cyberpunk presente en alleys of your mind y posteriormente en todo el detroit techno lo hace para mí acreedor sin duda de la condición de pionero


Una lágrima cae por mi mejilla al leerte amigo... efectivamente los motivos que expones fueron en su momento para mi
la clave cuando afirmé que ese se trataba del primer tema que, por decirlo de alguna manera, tenía el sonido que ahora reconocemos como Detroit techno.
Por aquellos tiempos no había aún una etiqueta. Eran chavales en un sitio sin futuro y precisamente su música siempre lo evoca.
De eso, de futuro, tiene mucho más Alleys of your mind, no cabe discusión. Sharevari adaptaba el antiguo estilo de vida y música de los 70 entre la comunidad negra añadiendo los ritmos y sintes exportados del tecno europeo y el tema de Cybotron es completamente revolucionario.. Escuchando todo lo que ha venido después se ve realmente la mayor influencia de ese tema que la de Sharevari.

Además de todo eso Juanito siempre a demostrado que como productor es el más dotado de toda esa generación, a las pruebas me remito.
http://soundcloud.com/scionav/02-dayshift

Saludos!!

_________________
Revolution is the Hope of the Hopeless!


23 Mar 2011, 17:00
Perfil

Registrado: 05 Mar 2004, 21:24
Mensajes: 2359
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
Efectivamente fuese cual fuese el pionero, en ese momento y en ese lugar nació algo maravilloso, que dios les bendiga por ello :smt001


23 Mar 2011, 19:06
Perfil

Registrado: 05 Feb 2004, 20:04
Mensajes: 137
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
La verdad es que 1987 parece algo alejado en el tiempo, pero si escuchamos lo que hay entre Nude Photo y Sharevari o Alleys of your mind, veremos que tampoco hay tanto.

Cybotron me suena demasiado a electro, y algunos temas, como Techno City, demasiado a synthpop. También como Model 500, en general, me recuerda más al electro que al techno. Tampoco cosas como Kreem me parecen techno: en su Triangle of Love se ve perfectamente la clara influencia del Italo en Detroit. Por otro lado, está el muchas veces olvidado Eddie Flashin Fowlkes, pero creo que es un sonido todavía muy cercano al house que se hacía en Chicago, al igual que el Let´s Go de X-Ray.

Si tenemos en cuenta cómo fue desarrollándose el techno, cómo fueron sus sonidos y su estructura, es decir, desde un punto de vista formal, creo que Nude Photo es un buen punto de partida.

Ideológicamente sí parece que Juan Atkins tenga más influencia, aunque éste a su vez estuviese influido por su compañero en Cybotron, Richard Davis y, sobre todo, por el p-funk de Funkadelic.


¡Un saludo!


23 Mar 2011, 22:54
Perfil
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 29 Nov 2007, 14:27
Mensajes: 259
Ubicación: Jackin' 2 the future...
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit




24 Mar 2011, 23:54
Perfil
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 28 Ene 2004, 15:12
Mensajes: 511
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
WOW no conocía estos vídeos.. fantasticos!!!!
como se marcan los temas en estudio esta gente.... ahí se ve realmente la talla como compositores de algunos de estos productores, que no tienen nada que ver con todos los que se dedican a copiar una y otra vez el mismo patrón con unos cuantos clicks durante 5min.
Kyle Hall es de los que más me gustan actualmente... firme heredero del sonido de Carl Craig. La fusión de ritmos jazz con los colchones y sintes del Detroit techno y los samples vocales... son ese tipo de música que te puede acompañar en cualquier buen momento...



El groove de este tema quita el hipo...

Saludos!!!

_________________
Revolution is the Hope of the Hopeless!


25 Mar 2011, 10:30
Perfil
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 28 Ene 2004, 15:12
Mensajes: 511
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
Un poquito de historia desde 1988..

http://www.backspinpromo.com/DetroitTechnoTheFaceMay1988.pdf

Por cierto... os recomiendo la revista waxpoetics que en su último número trae un extenso reportaje sobre los inicios del detroit techno y una entrevista con mike banks que como siempre no tiene desperdicio

_________________
Revolution is the Hope of the Hopeless!


28 Mar 2011, 15:32
Perfil

Registrado: 01 Sep 2005, 17:14
Mensajes: 2051
Ubicación: la literave
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
ke gustazo pasar por aki despues de un tiempo , y encontrarme kon todo esto humeando buenas vibras detroitianas... GRACIAS A TODOS¡¡


28 Mar 2011, 16:16
Perfil
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 25 Oct 2004, 20:33
Mensajes: 1438
Ubicación: 4K
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
hola,

muy guapos esos vídeos de kyle hall. tengo que investigar mejor la música de este tipo, he escuchado alguna remezcla de dubstep pero nada a fondo. tarea pendiente

altered_ego escribió:
Un poquito de historia desde 1988..

http://www.backspinpromo.com/DetroitTechnoTheFaceMay1988.pdf

Por cierto... os recomiendo la revista waxpoetics que en su último número trae un extenso reportaje sobre los inicios del detroit techno y una entrevista con mike banks que como siempre no tiene desperdicio

pues vi en algún sitio que su último número iba enfocado hacia la musica de baile y que hablaban de detroit y ur, pero no me hice con ella. tiene muy buena pinta

fundamental el artículo de the face sobre los orígenes. su publicación coincide en 1988 con el seminal varios techno the new dance sound of detroit que da a conocer mundialmente el sonido de la ciudad del motor y lo bautiza "oficialmente", lo que da idea de la importancia del reportaje

por aportar un poco más sobre ésto, leía hoy una entrevista a jeff mills de febrero de 1995 en la que además de hablar sobre el período de creatividad excepcional que vivió detroit en los ochenta, también reflexiona sobre el techno y la importancia conceptual del mismo así como sobre la forma de aproximarse a la creación que tiene en ur o a través de sus sellos. de imprescindible lectura

jeff mills - world exclusive transmission (está en la página 14)

Imagen

también se pronuncia (pág 17) sobre la disputa alleys of your mind vs sharevari :wink:

jeff mills en 1995 escribió:
"La mayor parte de la gente no sabe ésto pero había un grupo de chicos de instituto y el nombre de su grupo era Charivari. Tomaron el nombre de una tienda de ropa de Nueva York que todavía sigue allí. E hicieron un disco llamado "Charivari". Ese fue el primer disco de techno, antes de Cybotron, antes de Trasmat, antes de cualquiercosa. Ese fue el primero. Simplemente estaban haciendo un disco para su fiesta y era completamente techno"

como decía antes creo que lo que define el techno es algo más que unas precisas características musicales y tiene que ver con un entorno y con una forma de observar el mundo. en ese sentido, y solo en ese porque para el nude photo el techno para mí estaba totalmente definido, estoy con kirikú en que además de juan atkins hay que contar con richard davis y el imaginario de george clinton y toda la constelación parliament/funkadelic. especialmente importante me parece la figura de richard davis. no sé hasta qué punto su aportación era importante en lo musical, y quizá no lo sepamos, pero lo que es seguro es que es absolutamente determinante desde el punto de vista ideológico y conceptual con su paranoia post vietnam, su activismo político y su obsesión con alvin toffler

cuento con que alguno habréis leído todas estas cosas, pero dejo otro artículo interesante, este sobre cybotron

¿quién es richard davis?

Imagen

Citar:
(...) La historia oficial de Juan Atkins es bien conocida. Seguir a Richard Davis, sin embargo, resulta extremadamente complicado. La versión convencional de la historia parece querer, intencionalmente o no, restarle importancia. Autores como Ariel Kyrou afirman tranquilamente que “Juan Atkins creó Cybotron en 1981”. Lo habitual es que se repita una fórmula biográfica ya consolidada que introduce a Juan Atkins en primer lugar, nombra después el proyecto musical para añadir por último a Davis presentándole como “compañero” del primero. El mismo Atkins asume la explicación que le acredita como fundador cuando explica cómo se conocieron: “encontré a Rick Davis, que se convirtió en la otra mitad de mi grupo, Cybotron”. No hay indicio, sin embargo, que demuestre la existencia de una banda con anterioridad al encuentro de ambos productores. Quizá Atkins ya trabajara en ello, pero discográficamente Cybotron solo comienza con ambos funcionando en tándem. En realidad, de las entrevistas contemporáneas a Atkins lo único que se desprende es que, en el momento de conocerse, el de Belleville quedó maravillado ante el arsenal de sintetizadores del que disponía Davis. Es claro que éste tenía un dominio de este tipo de instrumentos superior al de Atkins. También debía llevar produciendo música por lo menos tanto tiempo como él. O quizá más, porque el veterano de Vietnam ya había publicado en solitario con anterioridad a Cybotron un 7” de ambient que salió en 1978 y que llegó a ser utilizado por The Electrifying Mojo como sintonía de su popular programa. ¿Hasta qué punto entonces llegó a influir Davis sobre Juan Atkins?

(...)

saludos


28 Mar 2011, 17:49
Perfil
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 28 Ene 2004, 15:12
Mensajes: 511
 Re: Somewhere In Detroit
Charivari era el nombre de una de las fiestas que organizaban la gente de la high school, parece ser la mejor de todas... principalmente mucha música italo y europea en general. Por allí sonaba mucho Kano y un grupo de los habituales decidieron hacer un tema en honor a esa maravillosa fiesta tomando prestado algo de una cara B de Kano, en concreto este tema ¿os suena?

[youtube]www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8l2kpp0OUw&feature=related[/youtube]

En cuanto a Rick Davis, estoy contigo en que muy bien no tenia que estar despues de vietnam, la numerología y vete a saber que más. Atkins dice de la primera vez que entro en su habitación:

"All you could see was the LED lights flashing. It was like I'd stepped into a whole new dimension"

Pillate la revista si tienes oportunidad, vale la pena.

Un saludo!!

_________________
Revolution is the Hope of the Hopeless!


28 Mar 2011, 18:20
Perfil
Mostrar mensajes previos:  Ordenar por  
Responder al tema   [ 1448 mensajes ]  Ir a página Anterior  1 ... 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97  Siguiente

Hilos relacionados
 Temas   Autor   Respuestas   Vistas   Último mensaje 
dETROIT

Hawtin sound

2

1102

07 Oct 2006, 17:50

Hawtin sound

Neo detroit

[ Ir a página: 1, 2 ]

moondex

28

2287

17 Mar 2009, 10:37

sOOcio

 


¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: No hay usuarios registrados visitando el Foro y 2 invitados


No puede abrir nuevos temas en este Foro
No puede responder a temas en este Foro
No puede editar sus mensajes en este Foro
No puede borrar sus mensajes en este Foro

Buscar:
Saltar a:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.
Traducción al español por Huan Manwë para phpbb-es.com
phpBB SEO